Posts for: June, 2015

By Beltsville Dental Care
June 22, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: celebrity smiles   bonding  
ARoyalFix

So you’re tearing up the dance floor at a friend’s wedding, when all of a sudden one of your pals lands an accidental blow to your face — chipping out part of your front tooth, which lands right on the floorboards! Meanwhile, your wife (who is nine months pregnant) is expecting you home in one piece, and you may have to pose for a picture with the baby at any moment. What will you do now?

Take a tip from Prince William of England. According to the British tabloid The Daily Mail, the future king found himself in just this situation in 2013. His solution: Pay a late-night visit to a discreet dentist and get it fixed up — then stay calm and carry on!

Actually, dental emergencies of this type are fairly common. While nobody at the palace is saying exactly what was done for the damaged tooth, there are several ways to remedy this dental dilemma.

If the broken part is relatively small, chances are the tooth can be repaired by bonding with composite resin. In this process, tooth-colored material is used to replace the damaged, chipped or discolored region. Composite resin is a super-strong mixture of plastic and glass components that not only looks quite natural, but bonds tightly to the natural tooth structure. Best of all, the bonding procedure can usually be accomplished in just one visit to the dental office — there’s no lab work involved. And while it won’t last forever, a bonded tooth should hold up well for at least several years with only routine dental care.

If a larger piece of the tooth is broken off and recovered, it is sometimes possible to reattach it via bonding. However, for more serious damage — like a severely fractured or broken tooth — a crown (cap) may be required. In this restoration process, the entire visible portion of the tooth may be capped with a sturdy covering made of porcelain, gold, or porcelain fused to a gold metal alloy.

A crown restoration is more involved than bonding. It begins with making a 3-D model of the damaged tooth and its neighbors. From this model, a tooth replica will be fabricated by a skilled technician; it will match the existing teeth closely and fit into the bite perfectly. Next, the damaged tooth will be prepared, and the crown will be securely attached to it. Crown restorations are strong, lifelike and permanent.

Was the future king “crowned” — or was his tooth bonded? We may never know for sure. But it’s good to know that even if we’ll never be royals, we still have several options for fixing a damaged tooth. If you would like more information, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Repairing Chipped Teeth” and “Crowns and Bridgework.”


By Beltsville Dental Care
June 14, 2015
Category: Oral Health
Tags: ibuprofen   pain management  
NSAIDsforPainManagementisSafe-ifUsedProperly

Millions of Americans regularly use ibuprofen to manage minor pain and swelling. As with other fields in healthcare, the drug is a mainstay in dentistry especially for post-procedural discomfort. But ibuprofen and similar drugs also have side effects that can lead to serious health problems. So, should you be concerned about its safety?

For most people, ibuprofen is safe and effective — but only if used properly. Like aspirin, ibuprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that reduces pain and inflammation by blocking the effect of substances called prostaglandins, released by injured or damaged tissues. NSAIDs differ in mechanism from pain relievers like steroids or narcotics and don’t have the same side effects, especially the addictive qualities and impaired consciousness potential of narcotics like morphine or codeine. While these more potent drugs are usually reserved for serious injuries or illnesses, NSAIDs like ibuprofen are ideal for mild to moderate pain following routine dental work.

The biggest concern for the use of an NSAID is its tendency to thin the blood, especially if used continuously over several weeks; this can make bleeding control more difficult after an injury. Prolonged overuse has also been linked to erosion of the stomach lining leading to ulcers or bleeding, kidney failure, early miscarriage and repeat heart attacks for patients with cardiovascular disease.

With this in mind, we recommend that adults take no more than 2,400 milligrams of ibuprofen during one twenty-four hour period for short-term pain relief unless otherwise recommended by a doctor. Research has shown that a single 400-milligram dose of ibuprofen is safe and effective for relieving even severe post-operative pain for about five hours in most people. On the other hand, we don’t recommend a NSAID during pregnancy or for people with a history of intestinal bleeding or heart attacks.

Taking into account your medical history and the procedure you’ll be undergoing, we will recommend the best pain management medication for your situation. In most cases, ibuprofen will be an effective means to reduce your discomfort level and, taken properly, will not pose a danger to your overall health.

If you would like more information on dental pain management, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Treating Pain with Ibuprofen.”